Lightsaber returned to Brooklyn Jedi

The Force is back with him!

The lightsaber of a real-life Brooklyn Jedi that was stolen a not-so-long time ago in a galaxy not-so-far away has been returned to its owner, ending a year-and-a-half-long saga that probably won’t continue.

The expensive-to-build, handmade saber was taken from Flynn Michael by some form of scum and villainy in September of 2011 when the self-described Jedi was hanging out at the Project Parlor on Myrtle Avenue between Sandford Street and Nostrand Avenue, his saber safely stashed beneath the bar — or so he thought.

During the subsequent search for the weapon, Michael, who founded New York Jedi, a stage performance group that teaches Jedi moves along with mind tricks, put up flyers, analyzed surveillance video, and even confronted a button-down gentleman whom he thought to be the culprit. But the tool — considered a mark of warrior a cut above the ordinary (after all, anyone can use a blaster or a fusioncutter) — was not found, leaving the Luke Skywalker wannabe with little hope for a reunion.

“I never thought I would see the thing again,” said Michael, 42.

Fast forward to Monday afternoon, when Michael received a strange correspondence (via e-mail, not hologram) from someone named “SithBandit” claiming the sword was sitting safely in Fort Greene Park near the Willoughby Street entrance wrapped like a candy cane.

Michael took his sandspeeder to the park and, as sure as Alderaan no longer exists, his trusty lightsaber was there — renewing the practicing Budhist’s faith in mankind.

“When it disappeared, I told the universe, ‘If I’m supposed to get it back, please bring it back to me,’ ” he said.

And now the universe has.

In an earlier episode of this Lucasian saga, Michael was given a replacement weapon by his students, who paid for an exact replica, which they presented to him three months ago. But no lightsaber could replace the one he designed himself.

“I thought I got it back when the kids gave me one,” he said. “But that wasn’t it.”

No scrolling text could explain why someone would want to steal a handmade lightsaber — let alone give it back — but friends of Michael have their theories.

“Whoever stole it realized it would be worthless to sell,” said Jason Hoffman, who helped Michael build his original.

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